Tag Archives: London

Staycation: St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel, London

Staycation: St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel, London

I probably go past the St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel around 2 to 3 times a week, I’ve been to events there, I’ve even had a few meetings, and each time I step inside the beautifully restored Victorian Gothic building the architecture takes my breath away, so I was a little giddy when I found out I’d be spending the night before whizzing over to Paris as part of a press trip.

The façade is spectacular, Gilbert Scott really knew what he was doing, and even during my short stay I loved getting lost just admiring the architectural details, from the grand staircase, which if you’re a Spice Girls fan you might recognise, to the Gothic Revival metalwork, gold leaf ceilings, the stunning wall designs, and those tiles that are just asking to be Instagrammed with the #IHaveAThingWithFloors!!!

Ren-st-pancras-2

Continue Reading…

Exhibition: Pradasphere At Harrods

Exhibition: Pradasphere At Harrods

When it comes to store takeovers Harrods has the competition beat, last year they allowed Dior to move onto the fourth floor of its Knightsbridge department store, the year before that it was Chanel, and this month is Pradasphere, dedicated to the diverse passions of Miuccia Prada and her amazing Prada collections.

Continue Reading…

LFW Diary: Day 1 – Dinosaur Jumper, Bora Aksu & A Nokia Skirt

LFW-Day1

There is a calm about this London Fashion Week, maybe it is because it is like my tenth or eleventh season, I really have lost count, or maybe it is just with the rain I know there is less pressure on my outfits because lets face it I am going to spend the whole five days soaked.

Today, I most certainly got soaked, it poured all day, so no proper outfit picture, just a crappy one taken on my mobile inside The Apartment, but I just had to share as I love this stripy dinosaur jumper from ASOS. I promise that I will share this beauty in another outfit post soon.

LFW-day-1-asos-jumperLFW-Day-1-Bora-Aksu

Day 1 at LFW has always been seen as filled with ‘lesser’ designers or ’emerging’ talent, and some editors and writers even miss it out completely, I am not sure why as the Friday schedule is always packed, and I love the mix of the romantic nature of Bora Aksu with the demi-couture vibe at Fyodor Golan, to the exquisite tailoring at Eudon Choi, and the outerwear chic you always see at Christopher Raeburn.

LFW-AW14-Bora-Aksu-1

Bora Aksu brings a touch of spring to AW14

Always a highlight for me is Turkish designer Bora Aksu, this season he presented a collection that was filled with his trademark femininity and a nod of nostalgia, with a line inspired by the letters his mother wrote while at boarding school. The uniformed school girl and the 1950s silhouette could be seen throughout the collection, which included Peter Pan collars, pencil skirts, high-necks and patchwork detailing. For the most part this seemed like a collection more suited to warmer climates than London, but it was nice to see girlie pinks and vibrant yellows alongside bold blues, oxblood red and monochrome. I can’t stress how much I loved this collection and I promise I will be sharing more images later in the week when I have edited them.

LFW-Day-1-Bora-Aksu-hair

Hair trend – Plaits

I know it is only day 1 but I have already spotted plaits on the catwalk, from the Heidi meets milk maid vibe of the ribbon plaits seen at Bora Aksu to the edgy braids at Fyodor Golan, which were hidden under sporty hats, and even Jean-Pierre Braganza sent his models down the runway sporting a braid with a white and blue painted strands. I wonder if this will continue throughout all of LFW.

LFW-Day-1-FG-hair LFW-Day-1-JPB-hair

Technology Meets Fashion

Technology and fashion always seems to collide during fashion week, whether its Google glasses on the DVF runway or Burberry filming their show with iPhones, it seems everyone wants a piece of the fashion pie. Well this season, Fyodor Golan pushed the boundaries by creating a skirt made out of 80 Nokia Lumia 1520 Smartphones. The design was really cool to see as each mobile was broadcasting its surrounds so it looked like the colours fluttered when the model moved.

LFW-Day-1-FG-NokiaLFW-Day-1-FG-AW14

Pink Isn’t Going Anywhere

One of most coveted items this autumn/winter has to be the pink coat and it seems pink it still on the minds of LFW designers, as it is only Day 1 and we’ve already seen it on the catwalk of Bora Aksu in a soft hue, as well as vibrant bold pink colours at Mark Fast and at Fyodor Golan who added a sports luxe vibe with this textured bomber jacket and baseball cap.

LFW-Day-1-Eudon-Choi-blue

Blue, Blue, and a bit more Blue

As well as pink, blue hues from baby blue to cobalt blue strutted down the catwalk. At Eudon Choi, the blues were bold, and seen on ruffled dresses and boxy knits, while at Christopher Raeburn the blue hue was more of a pastel share and looked more casual paired alongside khaki on chic outerwear. Dark blue was also used at Bora Aksu, for its cord two-pieces, as well as at Mark Fast for his knitted creations, while a sophisticated blue was seen on tailored pieces at J JS Lee.

LFW-Day-1-Eudon-Choi-neck

I will be back tomorrow with my Day 2 round-up, and fingers crossed a proper outfit post.

Exhibition: Hello, My Name Is Paul Smith

paul-smith-5

I love a good fashion exhibition, a chance to get a behind-the-scenes look into a fashion house, a designer or even a fashion icon, what the Design Museum have done to honour Paul Smith is much more than a celebration of his fashion but of him, his inspiration, how he ticks, it is more about his personality.

Hello, My Name Is Paul Smith, is a totally apt title for this exhibition, of course his fashion is explored, well actually it only has one room dedicated to the designer’s clothes, it is more about where he works, where he gets his inspiration, the items, pictures and trinkets he has picked up along the way, as well as a historical look back at his career to date. It really is fascinating.

The exhibition is sectioned off into themes, there is a mock-up of the first shop he owned in Nottingham, a 3m x 3m box, a recreation of his “cluttered” office, a gallery lined with framed pictures of images found, sent or captured by the designer, a replica of his design studio, as well a look at how the brand’s first showroom space in Paris inside a hotel suite, and a digital room featuring a short psychedelic film ‘Inside Paul’s Head’ along with screens showcasing abstract images, which is narrated by Smith explaining his creative process.

There are also rooms dedicated to the designer’s numerous collaborations from cars to teapots, his individual approach to the design of his shops, which includes a wall decorated with buttons, as well as a look behind-the-scenes of his menswear show in June, and there is even a fun ‘selfie’ area where you can snap yourself with life-size cardboard cut-outs of Smith.

There are many favourite bits in this exhibition – I love how his office is the focal point of the exhibit, it was fascinating to see the things that he keeps close by and that inspire him – from rabbit figurines, a pink Dyson, vintage cameras, a bike, and stacks of books. It makes me feel that my organised chaos surrounded by Barbie dolls is completely normal!!!

It was also nice to look back at the history of the brand through the invites and launch gifts – I wonder how many people will be checking eBay to get their hands on Paul Smith fashion transfers!!! The other highlight had to be the gallery filled with pictures he has collected over the years – some of which were pictures and letters that people had sent him and it was nice to see that he collects them.

What I loved most about this exhibition is its appeal to non-fashion people, fashion actually takes a back seat and it’s the creativity that shines through and it really is a fascinating look in to the mind of a fashion designer.

‘Hello My Name is Paul Smith’ at the Design Museum runs from November 15 – March 9, 2014.

paul-smith-23 paul-smith-2 paul-smith-31 paul-smith-6 paul-smith-22 paul-smith-11 paul-smith-9 paul-smith-13 paul-smith-29 paul-smith-15 paul-smith-17 paul-smith-14 paul-smith-10 paul-smith-7 paul-smith-19 paul-smith-32 paul-smith-3